The importance of ease to the finished look.

When we make a garment for a child we often think we should make it a few sizes larger to allow for growing room. This increases the amount of positive ease the garment is worn with. So if the child has a 20" chest, and we pick a size that has a finished chest measurement of 24", it will have 4" of positive ease.

Have you have thought about how the ease changes the look of the finished item though? Let's take a look at Pease Poridge. 

Here it is styled on my oldest son:

Photo credit: Knit Now Magazine

The garment as styled is an open front cardigan. You can see it fits well. The sleeve and body are just the right length and there is no pull on the button. The neckline is close fitting. It is being worn with about 2" of positive ease. The sample is 3-4 years and Leo was 3.5 at the time (wearing a mix of 3-4 year and 4-5 year size clothing from the shops). As it was a magazine sample, it was knit to fit with no growing room. 

 

Photo credit: Joeli's Kitchen

Photo credit: Joeli's Kitchen

And here is the same sample on Rowan. The garment now is styled as a jacket.  You can see the sleeves are just a bit long and the body goes down onto his hips. The fronts completely touch and the neckline is much wider. It is being worn with about 4" positive ease. It's still the 3-4 year sample but now on Rowan who is nearly 3 (and wearing mostly 2-3 year size clothing from the shops).

So, same garment, two different kids, two different looks! Make sure then that if you decide to size up you consider how it will change to the look of the garment.

Happy Knitting!

Joeli

Introducing: Toasty Explorer Socks

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My family likes to hike a lot. And when you hike you need hiking socks. And the best hiking socks, hands down, are wool hiking socks. Wool socks don't get wet like cotton socks do. They can actually absorb up to a third of their weight in moisture before you start to notice. Kind of important when you come across a path that has become one big, up-to-your-knee, mud puddle. And more importantly -- when they do get wet, they still keep your feet warm. Wool socks also allow your feet to breathe (keeping your feet cool on warm days) and they are naturally odour-resistant. Very important for sweaty feet that have been exploring all day. 

So I realised that our whole family could use some more hiking socks and thus Toasty Explorer Socks were born. 

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These socks are perfect for keeping feet toasty on hiking adventures. Sized for kids and adults, the whole family can have a pair -- no one’s feet need be cold again! The stitch pattern is small and easily memorisable so the knitting is fairly mindless and you can choose whichever construction is your favourite. Suitable for beginners sock knitters -- I’m happy to help and put up video tutorials as needed! (Tutorials can be found at http://www.joeliskitchen.com/tutorials/)

This pattern has three options: 
1. Top down with a heel flap, worked in one colour.
2. Top down with a short row heel, worked in one or two colours. This short row heel is worked over more than half the stitches to provide a better fit for higher insteps 
3. Toe up with a short row heel, worked in one or two colours. This short row heel is worked over half the stitches for a more traditional short row heel fit.

Sizes: Toddler (Child, Adult S, Adult M, Adult L)

Cuff circumference: 5.75 (6.5, 7.25, 8, 8.75)”

Yarn: 162 - 293 yards (148 - 268 m) of a DK / 8 ply (11 wpi) weight wool

Gauge: 11 stitches and 17 rows = 2 inches in stockinette stitch

£3